Preaching to Exiles in Babylon — Ezekiel 18

Ezekiel 18:1-13, 31-32

English Standard Version

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King James Version

Ezekiel 18:1-13, 31-32 KJV Commentary

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New American Standard Bible

Ezekiel 18:1-13, 31-32 NASB Commentary

Ezekiel 18:1-13, 31-32 NASB Large Print Commentary

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New International Version

Ezekiel 18:1-13, 31-32 NIV Commentary

Ezekiel 18:1-13, 31-32 NIV Large Print Commentary

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New Revised Standard Version

Ezekiel 18:1-13, 31-32 NRSV Commentary

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Teacher Study Hints for Thinking Further

Teacher Study Hints for Ezekiel 18:1-13, 31-32

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Crossword Puzzle with Answer Key

Ezekiel 18:1-13, 31-32

True and False Review Test with Answer Key

Ezekiel 18:1-13, 31-323

Word Search International Bible Lesson Puzzle

Ezekiel 18:1-13, 31-32
An Educational Take Home Review and Handout using Key Bible Lesson Words.

International Bible Lesson

“Rid yourselves of all the offenses you have committed,
and get a new heart and a new spirit.
Why will you die, people of Israel?”

(Ezekiel 18:31—NIV).

Why Will You Die?

Why Will You Die? (Large Print)

Why Will You Die? (Bulletin Size)

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Commentary and Lesson
by L.G. Parkhurst, Jr.

Why Jesus Came as King — John 18:37

Pilate asked him, “So you are a king?” Jesus answered, “You say that I am a king. For this I was born, and for this I came into the world, to testify to the truth. Everyone who belongs to the truth listens to my voice” (John 18:37)

If you asked people why Jesus was born, probably few would include the answer, “To testify to the truth;” however, Jesus told Pilate that He came into the world to communicate and demonstrate the truth. Jesus focused on teaching the truth, but He also claimed to be the truth (John 14:6). Believers may give a variety of reasons for why they became Christians, but they need to include, “Because Christianity is true.” Jesus always told the truth, and He spoke rightly when He declared, “My kingdom is not from this world” (John 18:36). Unfortunately, too many of those who want to rule in this world do not care about the truth or focus on always telling the truth. Too many who seek leadership in the kingdoms of this world unfairly characterize or misrepresent the ideas of their opponents. Whether they themselves live truthfully or not, most people want to hear the truth from their leaders and those who keep them informed about their government and their rulers. Some who concern themselves mostly with the kingdoms of this world think believing in Jesus and His moral values should disqualify a person from holding public office. Yet, King Jesus steadfastly refused to use unrighteous means to acquire political office or spiritual influence in the world. He consistently told the truth and trusted in His heavenly Father regarding the consequences. Furthermore, Jesus declared that those who belong to the truth will listen to His teachings and obey Him.

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by L.G. Parkhurst, Jr.

The Medical Aspects of the Crucifixion

In November 1979, I met Dr. Francis Schaeffer in Rochester, MN, where he was receiving treatment for cancer at Mayo Clinic. Through Francis and Edith Schaeffer, I met the artist, Floyd Hosmer, who at the time was a medical illustrator for Mayo Clinic. Later, Floyd and I compiled and edited Edith Schaeffer’s book, The Art of Life, with Floyd providing all the art work.

In 1986, Floyd Hosmer provided the medical illustrations for the article “On The Physical Death of Jesus Christ,” written by William D. Edwards, MD; Wesley J. Gabel, MDiv; Floyd E Hosmer, MS, AMI.

If you are interested in the medical aspects of the crucifixion and death of Jesus Christ, you can find a reprint of the article by clicking on: On The Physical Death of Jesus Christ.

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by L.G. Parkhurst, Jr.

Why Murder a Righteous Man? — John 18:30

They answered, “If this man were not a criminal, we would not have handed him over to you” (John 18:30).

In John 18:29, Pilate asked the religious leaders, “What accusation do you bring against this man?” His accusers knew Jesus had not really done anything wrong they could legally prove. They knew that if they charged Jesus with specific wrongdoings that He could outthink them and prove He was not guilty of breaking the Law of God, the Law of Love. So, they simply called Jesus a “criminal,” “malefactor,” or “evildoer.” Even today, we hear more name-calling than we hear clear thinking and rational discussion. Why did the religious elite really want Pilate to order Jesus’ death? First, other than the Romans, these religious leaders were the most privileged people in Israel. They wanted to maintain absolute control over the people, and with Jesus attracting large crowds He threatened their power. Second, they were the richest people in Israel. Because these leaders controlled the temple, they controlled the money-changing in the temple. If someone brought a sacrifice to the temple that they had not sold them, they could find some blemish and force them to buy their sacrifices from them at exorbitant prices. Jesus had cleansed their temple at least once, and they could not allow Jesus to interfere with their lucrative source of riches. Third, they wanted Jesus to suffer in the most cruel and degrading way possible, so they convinced Pilate to order Jesus’ death on a cross. Though they appeared to fear God, Jesus rightly said that inside they were “full of greed and self-indulgence.” Jesus also quoted Isaiah’s prophesy, “This people honors me with their lips, but their hearts are far from me” (see Matthew 23:25, Mark 7:6).

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by L.G. Parkhurst, Jr.

What Jesus Taught in Secret — John 18:20

Jesus answered, “I have spoken openly to the world; I have always taught in synagogues and in the temple, where all the Jews come together. I have said nothing in secret” (John 18:20).

When on trial before the chief priests, Jesus could have called Peter and John, two of His most faithful disciples, to testify on His behalf. They watched His trial from the courtyard. But Jesus had prayed and promised them that the Father and He would protect them so none of His disciples would be arrested or harmed. Jesus kept His promise, so He testified in His own defense. He testified that He had always spoken openly to the world. In the most prominent places, Jesus had given everyone the opportunity to hear everything He taught. John did not repeat everything the other gospel writers recorded, so in Mark 14:56, we learn, “Many gave false testimony against him, and their testimony did not agree.” Perhaps most importantly for people today, we learn from John that Jesus spoke openly to the world. Everything Jesus taught would benefit everyone in the world, if people believed and lived based on what Jesus taught. Perhaps more importantly, Jesus said that He taught nothing in secret. No ancient secret book or ancient secret society exists that truly tells what Jesus taught in secret, for Jesus never taught anything in secret. Jesus did explain His parables to His disciples, for they had “ears to hear” (an open mind and heart to learn the truth). As Jesus told Pilate in John 18:37, “Everyone who belongs to the truth listens to my voice.” Jesus’ disciples still listen to His voice as recorded in the Bible, for His first disciples wrote everything the Holy Spirit inspired them to remember.

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by L.G. Parkhurst, Jr.

The Night They Arrested God — John 18:6

When Jesus said to them, “I am he,” they stepped back and fell to the ground (John 18:6).

The religious authorities tried to arrest Jesus at various times during His ministry. In John 5:18, we learn they wanted to kill Jesus because “he was calling God his own Father, thereby making himself equal to God.” Using the divine name “I Am” to refer to himself, in John 8:58, Jesus said to them, “Very truly, I tell you, before Abraham was, I am.” In John 7:30, we learn they failed to arrest Jesus because His hour (or time) had not yet come. In John 7:45-46, when the chief priests and Pharisees asked the temple police why they had not arrested Jesus, they replied, “Never has anyone spoken like this!” In John 10:38-39, after Jesus said, “the Father is in me and I am in the Father,” they tried to arrest Him again, but they failed. In John 11:27, the religious authorities ordered that anyone knowing where Jesus was should tell them so they could arrest Jesus. Because His time had finally come, Judas betrayed Jesus and led Roman soldiers and temple police to the garden where Jesus could be found. On the one hand it was easy to arrest Jesus, for Jesus stepped forward to tell them who He was. On the other hand it was difficult, for when they asked for Jesus of Nazareth Jesus told them that He was Jesus of Nazareth, but He again referred to himself using the divine name “I Am.” Then, they experienced so much of His glory they stepped back and fell to the ground. [Note: some translations of John 18:6, add “he” in italics or in a footnote indicating “he” was added to the verse.]

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by L.G. Parkhurst, Jr.

The Primary Purpose of People — John 17:20-26

I made your name known to them, and I will make it known, so that the love with which you have loved me may be in them, and I in them (John 17:26)

Jesus’ last words in His last prayer for all who would become His disciples through His first disciples’ teachings carry great weight for us. Jesus prayed that we might be His disciples and be in the Father and the Son as the Father is in Jesus and Jesus is in the Father. In 1 Corinthians 6:19, Paul wrote that the disciple’s body is the temple of the Holy Spirit, which includes the Father and the Son for they cannot be separated from the Spirit. In His prayer, Jesus revealed that the Father loves Jesus’ disciples even as He loves Jesus. Envision the Father loving repentant sinners who believe in Jesus even as He loves His sinless Son! Even more, Jesus prayed that the love with which the Father loved Him would be in His disciples along with His presence within them. Humbly envision Jesus making you so morally and spiritually clean inside that you are fit for God to love you and live in you even as the Father and the Son love and live in one another! From Jesus’ prayer, we learn that Jesus has given all His disciples work to do, and one of their primary purposes is to love and live in such a way so that “the world may believe that the Father sent Jesus.” To make His point, Jesus said this twice in John 17:21 and John 17: 23! From Jesus’ prayer, we know why God made us: The Father wants to love and live in and through Jesus’ disciples as He does Jesus.

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by L.G. Parkhurst, Jr.

When a Lamb Saved the Sheep — Isaiah 53:6

All we like sheep have gone astray; we have all turned to our own way, and the LORD has laid on him the iniquity of us all (Isaiah 53:6).

God inspired the prophet Isaiah to compare people to sheep. Sheep are prone to wander away from their shepherd and flock. They eventually get lost, get into trouble, and sometimes get eaten by predators. People often act worse than sheep. God gave us minds, laws, and abilities to make good choices, but invariably at various times all of us have deliberately gone astray. Instead of following our Shepherd, we have chosen to go our own way. We have chosen the selfish and self-centered way instead of God’s way. Everyone has meditated on sinful desires and thoughts, and sometimes we have acted on those thoughts in ways that have brought harm to others and us. Because God loves everyone, God sent someone like a sheep to save us from our iniquity, our habitual practice of sin, and the eternal consequences of our disobedience. Isaiah wrote of him, “Like a lamb that is led to the slaughter, and like a sheep that before its shearers is silent, so he did not open his mouth” when He was oppressed and afflicted (Isaiah 53:7). Isaiah was, of course, writing about the Messiah that God planned to send, and when the Messiah came He died as a sacrificial lamb when He died on the cross. When John went to heaven and saw Jesus, he saw “a Lamb standing as if it had been slaughtered” (Revelation 5:6). He explained why God sent Jesus, “In this is love, not that we loved God but that he loved us and sent his Son to be the atoning sacrifice for our sins” (1 John 4:19).

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by L.G. Parkhurst, Jr.

What Predictions Did Jesus Fulfill? — Isaiah 53:11

Out of his anguish he shall see light; he shall find satisfaction through his knowledge. The righteous one, my servant, shall make many righteous, and he shall bear their iniquities (Isaiah 53:11).

Before Jesus was born, He and the Father agreed that in order for Jesus to save believers He would need to suffer as our scapegoat. Furthermore, Jesus would need to endure the anguish of the Suffering Servant predicted by Isaiah. According to Isaiah’s prophecy, the Lord “laid on him the iniquity of us all;” similar to the priest in the Old Testament, who laid the sins of the people on the scapegoat and drove it into the wilderness (see Leviticus 16 and Isaiah 53:6). While dying, Jesus suffered anguish, because He bore our iniquities (our wickedness). When tempted, Jesus never sinned; therefore, He became “the righteous one,” who served as the scapegoat to remove the sins of all who repent and trust in Him. When the Father raised Jesus from the dead, He saw light as predicted. Jesus removes the believer’s sins “to make many righteous;” however, we need more than our sins removed. Therefore, the Lord also promises, “I will put my law within them, and I will write it on their hearts” (Jeremiah 31:33). In addition, the Holy Spirit lives within Jesus’ people to empower them to live rightly according to the Scriptures. While in this world, Jesus’ followers will always be tempted to sin; therefore, “with the testing he will also provide the way out” (1 Corinthians 10:13). Because Jesus knew how much people would benefit from His sacrificial death, He experienced “satisfaction through his knowledge.” Moreover, “for the sake of the joy that was set before him he endured the cross, disregarding its shame” (Hebrews 12:2).

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by L.G. Parkhurst, Jr.

The Father’s Answer to Jesus’ Prayers — John 17:9-19

And for their sakes I sanctify myself, so that they also may be sanctified in truth (John 17:19)

Prior to His arrest, Jesus prayed for His disciples and for all who would become His disciples. When Jesus prayed, His Father answered Jesus’ prayers through Him. Jesus prayed; then, He worked, taught, and sacrificed for His disciples. In John 17:17, Jesus prayed: “Sanctify them in the truth; your word is truth.” Jesus prayed that His Father would use the truth to sanctify His disciples by setting them apart or consecrating them for holy use in God’s service. The Father still sanctifies Jesus’ disciples through Jesus. In John 1:14, John taught, “The Word became flesh and lived among us, and we have seen his glory, the glory of the Father’s only son, full of grace and truth.” Jesus is the Father’s Word made human. Jesus prayed the Father would use Him to sanctify His disciples. In John 14:6, Jesus taught His disciples that He is the truth. Jesus prayed that the Father would use the truth to make disciples who would do His will and show the world that the Father had sent Him into the world so believers in Him might not perish but have eternal life. Jesus prayed and then consecrated himself to answering His prayers in truth according to His Father’s will. With Jesus as their example, Jesus’ disciples consecrate themselves to God, for God to do His will through them. Consequently, Jesus’ disciples grow in grace and knowledge of Jesus Christ. They experience the joy of Jesus being made complete within them as Jesus prayed in John 17:13. Eventually, as Jesus prayed in John 17:23, some will see that the Father loves all Jesus’ disciples even as He loves Jesus.

Study the International Bible Study
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by L.G. Parkhurst, Jr.